Food Groups Rich in B-Vitamins

January 21, 2020


Food Groups Rich In B Vitamins Min

With the many health risks that come with age, more people have become health-conscious in recent years. Many are now practicing a healthier lifestyle by engaging in physical activities such as working out and sports. However, being active is not enough to keep your body healthy, it is also essential to watch what you eat.

 

           One health condition that must be prevented is vitamin B deficiency. Lack of vitamin B may cause problems related to the brain, nerves, and even the heart. Fortunately, B-vitamins may be found in a number of food groups.


Below are the food groups that contain the highest daily value (DV)—the amount of nutrients in one serving of food—for specific members of the Vitamin B family, as reflected in the fact sheets by the Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS).


As a general rule, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) stated that 20% DV or more of a nutrient per serving is a high amount, but that does not mean food sources with less than 5% DV are no longer effective. [1]

 

Fortified Cereals


            Cereals are considered one of the most popular breakfast options and is usually fortified with minerals and nutrients. Fortification is often done to help improve nutrient intake through foods that are commonly consumed by children and adults. [2]


            Eating cereals regularly can help reduce the risk of developing aging diseases like heart disease, cancer and even diabetes.[13]


Many breakfast cereals are fortified with B-vitamins. Here are the common ones found in our favorite cereals.


Table 1: Fortified cereals and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin)

1.5

100

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

1.7

100

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

10

100

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [3] [4] [6]


            It is important to note that some fortified cereals are high in sugar, so be sure to check the label before buying. If you can, always choose cereal brands that are low in sugar and high in fiber.[2]


Meat


Animal meat, including chicken, beef, and pork, is packed with B-vitamins that provide energy to the body.[11] Beef liver, in particular, contains the most B-vitamin nutrients.


Table 2: Beef liver and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

2.9

171

Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

14.9

75

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid)

8.3

83

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

0.9

45

Vitamin B9 (Folate)

215

54

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

70.7

1,178

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [4] [5] [6] [7] [9] [10]


            Meat has a key participation in keeping the body’s energy production and digestion functioning properly.[14]

 

Eggs

            Eggs are also a great source of Vitamin B. Experts suggest eating the entire egg to get the most of its nutritional benefits. Some B-vitamins are found in the yolk, so it is best not to set it aside. [11] Eggs have several health benefits. Some of the remarkable ones include good brain health, energy production, and a healthy immune system.[15]

            According to the Office of Dietary Supplements’ fact sheet, eggs have high Vitamin B7 or Biotin content. It is indicated there that a whole cooked egg contains 10.0 milligrams of Vitamin B7 per serving. [8]

 

Whole Grains

A staple in every Filipino home, rice, along with other whole grains such as oats and whole wheat, consists of B-vitamins that help provide the body with energy for the day. [11]


The B-vitamins can be found on the outer layer of the grain called the bran. The minerals in this section slows down the breakdown of starch to glucose, so it helps keep blood sugar levels steady and prevents it from sharply spiking up.[12]


Table 3: Whole grains and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN/FOOD

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) – White rice, long-grain, enriched, parboiled, ½ cup

1.4

73

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) – Instant oats, fortified, cooked with water, 1 cup

1.1

65

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [3] [4]

 

Legumes

            Popular legumes such as black beans, pinto beans or lentils are all rich in B-vitamins. [11] Chickpeas notably have the highest source of Vitamin B6 or Pyridoxine.[7]

Being packed with B-vitamins, legumes help boost the brain; plus, it can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. This is one reason why many vegans often eat beans.[16]


Table 4: Legumes and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN/FOOD

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) – Black beans, boiled, ½ cup

0.4

27

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) – Chickpeas, canned, 1 cup

1.1

55

Vitamin B9 (Folate) – Black-eyed peas (cowpeas), boiled, ½ cup

105

26

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [3] [7] [9]

 

Leafy Green Vegetables

            There is a good reason why parents tell their kids to eat their vegetables—green leafy vegetables carry more nutrients than any other food. They are also a great source of Vitamin B. [11]


Table 5: Leafy green vegetables and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN/FOOD

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B9 (Folate) – Spinach, boiled, ½ cup

131

33

Vitamin B9 – Asparagus, boiled, 4 spears

89

22

Vitamin B9 – Brussels sprouts, frozen, boiled, ½ cup

78

20

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [9]


            Consider adding leafy green vegetables to your diet because they have antioxidant properties. These protect the body’s cells and help block the early stages of cancer. Similarly, because this group contains high levels of Folate, these vegetables promotes heart health and aids in preventing birth defects.[17]

 

Shellfish

       

     Clams, in particular, are an excellent source of Vitamin B. In fact, these have the highest daily value of Vitamin B12 compared to other food groups. Furthermore, shellfish help improve the body’s red blood cell production, brain function, and metabolism. [12] Here are the specific B-vitamins that can be found in clams.


Table 6: Clams and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

0.4

24

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin)

84.1

1,402

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [4] [10]

 

Fish


Fatty fish contain more Vitamin B than other kinds of fish. For those who are not fans of fatty fish can opt to eat delicate white fish instead.[11] Similar to shellfish, this food group takes care of the human body’s nervous system and digestive system. [12]


Table 7: Fish and Vitamin B

B-VITAMIN/FOOD

MILLIGRAMS PER SERVING

DAILY VALUE (%)

Vitamin B1 (Thiamin) – Trout, cooked, dry heat, 3 ounces

0.4

27

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) – Salmon, sockeye, cooked, 3 ounces

8.6

43

Vitamin B3 – Tuna, light, canned in water, drained, 3 ounces

8.6

43

Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine) – Tuna, yellowfin, fresh, cooked, 3 ounces

0.9

45

Vitamin B12 (Cobalamin) – Trout, rainbow, wild, cooked, 3 ounces

5.4

90

Source: Office of Dietary Supplements [3] [5] [7] [10]

 

            In conjunction with the abovementioned food groups, taking vitamin B supplements will help produce results. B supplements such as Fortiplex is a great way to help prevent vitamin B deficiency. Fortiplex is a fortified Vitamin B-complex supplement that helps combat Vitamin B deficiency symptoms such as memory loss, mood disorder, and other common aging diseases. Unlike other brands, Fortiplex is composed of five essential B-vitamins, including Vitamins B2 and B3.

 

           Keeping and maintaining physical, emotional and mental health doesn’t have to be tedious and expensive–a capsule of Fortiplex is just Php 18.68 SRP!

 

           Remember, practicing the right habits and following a proper diet can do wonders, especially as one ages!

 

References:

[1] U.S. Food and Drug Administration. % Daily Value. Access Data FDA. Retrieved from: https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/InteractiveNutritionFactsLabel/pdv.html

[2] Sobel, A., R.D. (2019). What is Fortified Cereal, and is it Healthy?. Healthline. Retrieved from: https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/fortified-cereal

[3] Office of Dietary Supplements. Thiamin: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Thiamin-HealthProfessional/

[4] Office of Dietary Supplements. Riboflavin: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Riboflavin-HealthProfessional/

[5] Office of Dietary Supplements. Niacin: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Niacin-HealthProfessional/

[6] Office of Dietary Supplements. Pantothenic Acid: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/PantothenicAcid-HealthProfessional/

[7] Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin B6: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB6-HealthProfessional/

[8] Office of Dietary Supplements. Biotin: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Biotin-HealthProfessional/

[9] Office of Dietary Supplements. Folate: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Folate-HealthProfessional/

[10] Office of Dietary Supplements. Vitamin B12: Fact Sheet for Health Professionals. National Institutes of Health. Retrieved from: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminB12-HealthProfessional/

[11] Murphy, R. (2019). 10 Foods that give you vitamin B. Insider. Retrieved from: https://www.insider.com/foods-that-are-high-vitamin-b-2019-6

[12] Melodie Anne. (2018). Seafood with B12. SFGate. Retrieved from: https://healthyeating.sfgate.com/seafood-b12-7190.html

[12] Harvard TH Chan. Whole Grains. Harvard School of Public Health. Retrieved from: https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/what-should-you-eat/whole-grains/

[13] Better Health Channel. Cereals and Whole Grain Foods. Better Health Channel. Retrieved from: https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/HealthyLiving/cereals-and-wholegrain-foods

[14] Robinson, J. (2017). The Health Benefits of (The Right Kinds of) Meat. Ace Fitness. Retrieved from: https://www.acefitness.org/education-and-resources/lifestyle/blog/6602/the-health-benefits-of-the-right-kinds-of-meat

[15] McIntosh, J. (2019). Everything you need to know about eggs. Medical News Today. Retrieved from: https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/283659.php

[16] Cleveland Clinic. (2016). Why Beans, Packed with Vitamin B, Can Boost Your Brain Power. Cleveland Clinic. Retrieved from: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/boost-your-brain-with-b-vitamins-and-beans/

[17] Lin Yan. (2013). Dark Green Leafy Vegetables. USDA Agricultural Research Service. Retrieved from: https://www.ars.usda.gov/plains-area/gfnd/gfhnrc/docs/news-2013/dark-green-leafy-vegetables/